Memorandum submitted to the Anglo-American Committee of Enquiry into the Jewish Problem in Europe and the Future of Palestine by the Zionist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland, London 1946.

The Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry (AACI), formed in December 1945, was created to study the situation of Jewish survivors in Europe and the problems connected with their resettlement in Palestine. Composed of six British and six American members, the Committee was charged with gathering information and making recommendations on, first, the effect of Jewish immigration … Continue reading Memorandum submitted to the Anglo-American Committee of Enquiry into the Jewish Problem in Europe and the Future of Palestine by the Zionist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland, London 1946.

Tshuva BeInyan Gelatin, by Rabbi Kopul Kahana, London 1966

This is an interesting booklet, and I must state at the outset that I am writing about books and publications in my library.  It is not my purpose to get into the question of whether gelatin is or is not kosher. Rabbi Kopul Kahana was born in Eisiskes, Lithuania, in 1895, studied in Lithuanian yeshivos … Continue reading Tshuva BeInyan Gelatin, by Rabbi Kopul Kahana, London 1966

Folk Un Literatur (People and Literature), Leo Kenig, London, 1947.

Folk Un Literature is subtitled: Five lectures on the main tendencies and characteristics of modern Yiddish literature, and a dissertation on Jews in modern art.  Leo Konig was born near Minsk and brought up in Odessa, where he attended the Yeshiva of Chaim Tchernowitz (Rav Tsair). From 1908 to 1912 he studied art at the … Continue reading Folk Un Literatur (People and Literature), Leo Kenig, London, 1947.

Lemech HaSheni by Ben-A Sochachewsky, London 1946

Ben-A Sochachewsky (1889-1958) was a journalist, poet and teller of Chassidic stories.  He was born in Lodz, Poland, and arrived in London about 1913. He was on the editorial staff of Di Zeit, the London Yiddish newspaper, of which I have written about here. His actual name was Yechiel Meir or "Chil Majer" Sochachewsky, but … Continue reading Lemech HaSheni by Ben-A Sochachewsky, London 1946

In Meine Teg (In my Days), Memoirs by Selig Oberman, London 1947

This book is an important autobiography in Yiddish in three parts that includes not only the authors earlier experiences in Warsaw, but also, especially, London.  Selig Oberman details memories of the Black Lion Yard Shtiebel, Bethnal Green Synagogue and the Dalston Talmud Torah.  Selig Oberman, or to give him his full name, Asher Zelig Oberman … Continue reading In Meine Teg (In my Days), Memoirs by Selig Oberman, London 1947

In Zchus Fun Di Teg (For the Sake of the Days), Moysheh Oyved, London 1946

Moysheh Oyved was the pseudonym of Edward Good, born Moshe Gudak in 1885 in Skampe (Skape), Vlotsavek District, Poland.  His father was a Chazan (Cantor) and Schochet (Slaughterer) near Torun (Thorn) near the German border.  In 1908 he opened a jewellery ship in London which prospered and became known as "Cameo Corner" near the British … Continue reading In Zchus Fun Di Teg (For the Sake of the Days), Moysheh Oyved, London 1946

Sefer Rav HaChovel by Rabbi Jacob Leib Davidson, London 1952

This is a book by another rather forgotten Rabbi, Jacob Leib Davidson, a long -time resident of South Tottenham.  Rabbi Davidson was born on 23rd July 1875, and died in London in 1960.  According to Rabbi Joseph Unterman (who was Rabbi of the South Tottenham Synagogue), writing his obituary in the Jewish Chronicle, he was … Continue reading Sefer Rav HaChovel by Rabbi Jacob Leib Davidson, London 1952

Peace is Everybody’s Business, by Ilya Ehrenburg, London (Narod Press) 1970

Israel Narodiczky and his sons (after his death) did not just print Hebrew and Jewish books. He also printed a wide variety of Anarchist, Socialist and other political publications. This booklet, with two speeches by Ilya Ehrenberg was published by the press department of the Soviet Embassy in Britain and printed by the Narod Press … Continue reading Peace is Everybody’s Business, by Ilya Ehrenburg, London (Narod Press) 1970